The Renaissance Connection Innovations: 1400-2020
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Apple Quick Take 100

Today—Digital Camera
The first digital camera was a team effort between Apple Computers and Kodak film. The first mass marketed color digital camera was the Apple Quick Take 100. Since then the digital camera has gone through numerous improvements gaining new features each time.


Lumiere autochrome picture
Daytona, Florida, an autochrome picture by Charles C. Zoller.
Copyright © 2002 George Eastman House, Rochester, NY

1907—Color Film
The Lumiere brothers achieved a new and exceptional quality with their autochrome plates. The three-color plates became the first commercial color film that was available to everyone.


1888 Kodak camera
Patent drawing for Eastman's 1888 camera.
Image courtesy of PatentMuseum.com

1888—First Kodak Camera
"You press the button, we do the rest" was the slogan for the first Kodak camera introduced in 1888. George Eastman founder of Kodak wanted a camera simple enough for everyone. The first Kodak camera came preloaded with a 200-foot roll of film enough to take 100 circular pictures.


Paint in Tube

1800—Paint in Tubes
By 1800 oil paints were being sold in tin tubes, allowing painters to bring their supplies right out into nature. The painters in the Romantic period took advantage of this and were allowed the freedom to capture nature at a specific moment in time.


Giovanni Agostino da Lodi: Adoration of the Shepherds
Giovanni Agostino da Lodi, (Italian)
Adoration of the Shepherds
1510
Oil on panel
Samuel H. Kress Collection.

1510—The Renaissance Connection
While Medieval artists concentrated on the religious meaning of their work rather than on making the subjects look lifelike, Renaissance painters and sculptors preoccupied themselves with trying to represent people and nature in a more realistic way. Adoration of the Shepherds is but one example of a Renaissance painting that demonstrates new ideas and methods artists were experimenting with at the time.

One of the most significant innovations in painting occurred in 1410 with the development of slow drying oil paints. Artist Jan Van Eyck was the first to show the world the intensity of oil painting. Van Eyck had a desire to capture every detail of nature just as it was seen. With their translucent nature, oil paints allowed him to create more subtle tones of light and color. No longer forced to use fresco and tempera, these new thick and colorful paints not only allowed artists more time with their work and the ability to paint over earlier efforts, but also increased the range of pigments or colors as they could be blended on the painting itself to create smooth changes in tone. Renaissance artists could now move towards representing the world around them as realistically as possible much like today's who capture the world using digital technology.


Jan van Eyck: The Virgin and Child and Donor
The Virgin and Child and Donor, by Jan van Eyck

1410—Oil Paints
Artist Jan van Eyck was the first to show the world the intensity of oil painting. Van Eyck had a desire to capture every detail of nature just as it was seen, with their translucent nature, oil paints allowed him to create more subtle tones of light and color.


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